Jeanne Koré Salvato

Postings from Godot

no one is talking about this

no one is talking about this

This is the third in our series of novels, which, when we have read the seven contestants for the debut novelist prize, we will present the people’s vote. But what if you are not reading these?

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waiting4

waiting4

I’ve been thinking about what it must be like to be waiting for Godot. What are we waiting for again?

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awol

awol

Last week you may (or may not) have gleaned that your dedicated blogist had moved that day from Webster, NY, to Rochester, NY, about a half an hour drive away.

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the novel and the nightingale

the novel and the nightingale

Not long ago on the radio I head a solo piano piece called, I thought,” Le Rossignol a disparu.” Ah, just like Milan Kundera’s nightingale, I thought, who has also disappeared.

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politics en France

politics en France

It is no wonder that Samuel Beckett set his play, “Waiting for Godot,” in the French countryside with a leafless tree and a moon for company.

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le Petit Prince

le Petit Prince

I recently listened to a podcast by writer and teacher Maryama Antoine, called, “Toni Morrison, on the pursuit of goodness.” Ah, that word, “goodness.”

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The City of Good Death

The City of Good Death

The title of the novel The City of Good Death by Priyanka Champaneri, already contains an interesting premise to think about.

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Ukraine2

Ukraine2

The haunting image of a musician playing farewell on her piano to her home that had been by the Russians has chased many other thoughts away.

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breaking the bank

breaking the bank

As the world watches the financial sanctions among other penalties imposed upon Russia and Mr. Putin, the world may be tempted to think that banking problems would be the least of Mr. Putin’s worries.

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ukraine

ukraine

Last night I listened to historian Timothy Snyder talk about the invasion of Ukraine with American author and social critic Ta-Nehisi Coates.

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the people’s voice

the people’s voice

Today’s post features two books. First, a final reflection on the notion of the outcast, prompted by Camus’ book L’Etranger.

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L ‘Etranger

L ‘Etranger

Translation is a funny thing. Because I speak two languages, I am intrigued by how we manage to get from one to another.

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live a little, read a little: novel 1

live a little, read a little: novel 1

Dear Reader, We interrupt our regular programming to talk about the first book in our series of seven. For those of you who don’t know, The Center for Fiction in Brooklyn, NY, presented a contest for debut novelists last December.

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Happy birthday, Ulysses!

Happy birthday, Ulysses!

Dear Readers,
Our whole writing4godot began really with a celebration of June 16, the day in 1904 on which James Joyce’s book Ulysses takes place.

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alors

alors

Sometimes there’s a short word of interest, a short blog post, a short short story.

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women of paris 2

women of paris 2

The women are still walking! Our tour guide extraordinaire, Chris Friendly, a teacher and historian who lies in Paris, has created walking tours unlike the usual ones found in the usual guidebooks.

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women of paris I

women of paris I

Highlights of a walking tour set us firmly on Paris ground, courtesy of historian, teacher and modern-day wit, Chris Friendly.

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northern lights

northern lights

I once held a session in a computer lab for students learning English. It was a poetry lesson, and we called up pictures of the northern lights for inspiration.

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les restos du coeur

les restos du coeur

Some French friends and I were recently discussing the idea of the commonwealth of a country. France thinks differently about the common good . . .

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cheating

cheating

The value of cheating. First, cheating is fun. It is more fun to do than to read about, I’m guessing.

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la toussaint

la toussaint

Someone asked me what I miss about France in October, and the answer was la Toussaint

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mix it up

mix it up

Today I’d like to showcase a book called A Visit from the Goon Squad by Jennifer Egan.

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Mavis Gallant

Mavis Gallant

One of Canada’s finest short story writers, Mavis Gallant, was an expat writer who lived in Paris for much of her writing life.

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violin lessons

violin lessons

Driving. I have refrained from the litany of driving anxiety experiences, only because, well, even I didn’t want to dwell on them.

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take an artist to lunch

take an artist to lunch

It has been sobering and at the same time exhilarating to contemplate the sacrifice of a person who offered her life to fight against the Nazis, pledging herself to freedom.

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Noor Inayat Khan

Noor Inayat Khan

The first thing you notice when standing in front of the gate surrounding Fazil Manzil, Noor’s family home, is the plaque commemorating her deportation.

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homage to the cello

homage to the cello

As I was organizing my papers to begin a part-time teaching position at a small liberal arts college, here in Rochester, I found the prettiest collages French students had made of instruments.

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mayors and cellos

mayors and cellos

Last week’s post was titled, “Why Godot?” So, applying logic, this one could be, “Why France?”

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why Godot?

why Godot?

It’s time for a new season of writing4godot. I’d like to begin by talking about why I’ve chosen “Waiting for Godot” for my patron saint.

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bits and bobs

bits and bobs

“It’s a very bits and bobs piece of writing.” This is how, apparently, you use the phrase “bits and bobs” in a sentence, according to the all-knowing Internet.

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Lafayette

Lafayette

As we approach the Fourth of July in the States, my thoughts naturally turn to Gilbert du Motier, Marquis de Lafayette.

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juneteenth 2.0

uneteenth is about to become a national holiday! I thought I would do something interesting, which is leave the post for last Juneteenth as it is, and give an intro for the following couple of reasons. When I re-read this post, I noticed that I said something about...

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books à la française:  the sequel

books à la française: the sequel

I strolled into a used bookstore in Versailles, France. It’s true. On the one hand, you’ve got the beautiful gardens of the Versailles Palace, not to mention the Palace itself. And then there’s a used bookstore.

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afficky

afficky

Lo and behold, we recently celebrated Africa Day on 25 May. An Irish friend reacted to my surprise that there was an Africa Day in Dublin.

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the teenage philanthropist

The common good is something we look at differently in the States and in France. The word, “common,” is an unglamorous word on its own, but linked with “good,” it has a whole different meaning.

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the world draws near

African women wear such beautiful garments. I would admire the colorful, patterned material they wrapped around their hair to match their African dress when, in their role as nannies, they’d drop their young charges off at my daughter’s French school.

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la FNAC plays jazz

I once read that someone would so rather read what it’s like to live in a country, say, France, than to hear about the tourist highlights. Now, some of the tourist highlights are very important to a city such as Paris, but if you do live in France, you will certainly encounter La FNAC.

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